Jason Snyder

Dentate Gyrus Neurons
Dentate Gyrus Neurons

2012

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Four Adult-born Cells
Four Adult-born Cells

Virus: a new tool for generating pretty pictures (2012) Using a retrovirus, which infects dividing cells, I made the amazing discovery of four adult-born cells which all had the exact same shape and were located right next to each other!

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Dentate Granule Cells
Dentate Granule Cells

Virus: a new tool for generating pretty pictures (2012) More dentate granule cells, infected with Herpes Simplex Virus and expressing GFP

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GFP+ CA1 Pyramidal Neurons
GFP+ CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

Virus: a new tool for generating pretty pictures (2012) In the process of learning the surgeries required to stereotactically inject the virus, you inevitably target the wrong regions. Which is fun because then you get a glimpse of something new. Here are GFP+ CA1 pyramidal neurons. You can see their axons projecting down and to the left, towards the subiculum.

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CA1 Pyramidal Neurons
CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

Virus: a new tool for generating pretty pictures (2012) More CA1 pyramidal neurons from the same animal but an adjacent section. I love the fanning of the dendrites.

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Retrovirally-labelled, Non-neuronal
Retrovirally-labelled, Non-neuronal

Virus: a new tool for generating pretty pictures (2012) Every day I see a retrovirally-labelled, non-neuronal (?) cell that looks more beautiful than the last one I imaged. Makes me want to cry.

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Dentate Granule Cell Axons
Dentate Granule Cell Axons

Virus: a new tool for generating pretty pictures (2012) Here are dentate granule cell axons, the mossy fibers, flowing through CA3 pyramidal neuron cell bodies, like a river gushing over rocks. In the woods. The balls on a string appearance is caused by the infamously large presynaptic boutons, which are distributed along the axon (like balls on a string, thin rope, or even dental floss).

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Flowing GFAP
Flowing GFAP

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011) One trick on the confocal microscope is to use a larger pinhole so that a greater thickness of the section is captured in the image. Images acquired this way are comparable to a bunch of thin sections that are then merged into a “z-stack” except that some of the tissue is out of focus, giving rise to the blurry “rushing water” look that you see here.

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Blood Vessels Transverse
Blood Vessels Transverse

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011) A transverse cut through two blood vessels (in contrast to the parallel cut, previous). Where’s Waldo fans: find the catcher’s mitt cell in this picture.

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Cell Nuclei
Cell Nuclei

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011) If GFAP was a catcher’s mitt then, uhh, cell nuclei would be…

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Hippocampal Fissure
Hippocampal Fissure

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011) An ultrasaturated look at the hippocampal fissure.

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Third Ventricle
Third Ventricle

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011)

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Dorsal Third Ventricle
Dorsal Third Ventricle

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011)

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Astrocytes and Radial Glia
Astrocytes and Radial Glia

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011) An argument against the conventional red, green and blue color scheme of histological imagery.

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Dentate Gyrus with Blood Vessels
Dentate Gyrus with Blood Vessels

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011) An argument for the conventional red, green and blue color scheme of histological imagery. (Check out all the radial cell processes extending through the lower blade of the dentate gyrus. Red = thymidine kinase)

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Ectoptic Young Neurons
Ectoptic Young Neurons

Astrocytes - a story in pictures (2011) Newborn mice neurons (in red) in the molecular layer.

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