Mōna, the Moon: Absence
Mōna, the Moon: Absence

Mōna, the Moon, challenges the solitariness of reality. This connectedness can be embodied in another consciousness, and when this connection falls away, our understanding of experience must be reexamined. A light sculpture, seized via digital photography, or a sentient being, made of a trajectory of light, Mōna is an embodiment of radical otherness which we inescapably seek to personify. (Descriptions continued in the next piece)

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Mōna,the Moon:I Fell Into Your Light
Mōna,the Moon:I Fell Into Your Light

(Continuing from the previous piece) A light sculpture, seized via digital photography, or a sentient being, made of a trajectory of light, Mōna is an embodiment of radical otherness which we inescapably seek to personify. Its gestures are fulfilled with familiar human sentiments – like grief of a primordial separation, and longing for returning to one’s unidentifiable cosmic counterpart.

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Mōna, the Moon: The Merciless Empty
Mōna, the Moon: The Merciless Empty

(This is the third piece of the series.)

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Mōna, the Moon
Mōna, the Moon
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Infancy
Infancy
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No Rising Moon
No Rising Moon
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January 3
January 3
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Morning
Morning
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Out
Out
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Theia
Theia
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14
14
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Most Ancient Light
Most Ancient Light
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Jesus of the Planets and the Stars
Jesus of the Planets and the Stars
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Lit
Lit
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Be Sober
Be Sober
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Artist Statement:

 

Within my practice, I construct dark space installations in which the viewer has no point of reference to understand the space or to localise the experience. Using a small amount of light in a dark space, I create an illusion of a physical object, which is intended to suggest a conscious physicality that might exist outside our understanding within or outside of our universe. The work acts as a reference to our still-limited understanding of our strange existence and cosmos.

 

The installations are created to be experienced in the moment, and for this reason are not recorded in a traditional sense. However, the wall-mounted objects I create are a direct output of the installations. I often use perspex face-mounted c-types for these pieces; the reflection is key to the viewer becoming implicated in the artwork and seeing themselves in relation to these transcendent objects. The viewer must focus their eyes from the image to their reflection, which creates a direct relationship between them and the symbolised uncertainty that shrouds our entire existence.